Guest post: We help you learn better

I wrote earlier about how one of my projects for the summer is to improve the UBC Learning Commons website. Sam Wempe, one of the brilliant students on my team wrote a post about what we are trying to achieve, where we have come and what we still have left to do.

Below is the article that he wrote, originally published on the Learning Commons site:

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This summer, myself and a team from the Chapman Learning Commons have been working on an epic endeavor; nothing short of a website that helps students learn better. As with any website, the first hurdle is actually getting users to your site, followed by the equal challenge of providing information in a way that is not only engaging but useful.

The current site is a goldmine of resources thats has grown enormously over the years; however, student feedback has shown that this growth has made many of these resources hard to locate or take advantage of. Based on these responses, we focused on three inter-related issues.

Navigation

so many menus! so many layers!
so many menus! so many layers!

As a result of the large amount growth the site experienced over the years in an attempt to become a one-stop shop on campus, the content outgrew the organizational structure. Due to the challenges that existed in making a website 5-6 years ago, this made perfect sense as there was very little UBC content online. Luckily, by May of this year, many of our partners have developed quality websites themselves, giving us the ability to concentrate on building a solid site centered on the student academic experience.

Remedies

  • 2 clicks or less intuitive navigation: done through condensing and renaming menus, reducing the amount of potential pathways down to just a few, very logical ones. The design aspect below was also crucial to this.
  • Trim the fat: cut out as much content as possible that does not relate to improving your academic life. For example, if someone happened to be interested in abroad opportunities, they would be referred to Go Global’s own website; as opposed to trying to maintain this content ourselves. This makes the site leaner and more efficient.

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Visual

One should also know the point of a website by just glancing at it. If a user likes a site’s main feature, they are more likely to stick around and look into other resources; something seriously lacking in the current site. Text-heavy pages scare away users, overly busy sidebars distract and constrain the content and providing users as many navigational options as possible created too many moving parts and points for confusion – all these needed to be refreshed for 2011 and beyond.

concept of new learning commons site

Remedies

  • Break up content pages: elimination of large blocks of text and utilization of ample forms of digital media, such as youtube videos, slideshare presentations, podcasts, etc.
  • Dropped the sidebar: to free up more digital real estate on the page for content and moved any crucial bits to the bottom.
  • App-Like carousel and landing pages: use the front page carousel to highlight the most common reasons someone would visit the website. Currently this is used to highlight current or upcoming events (which confused the mission of the site, according to student feedback); this has been moved to blog-like feed just below the ‘Welcome to the Learning Commons Banner.’ While the landing pages act as visual launchpad to the various resources within the heading.

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Engaging and Interactive Content

There are incredibly valuable resources on the site which took an immense amount of work and research to put together. The problem revealed through the navigation and visual aspect, was that this content was both hard to find and hard to get through. Reading lots of text is no fun, but try getting a stressed, time-pressed student to read five pages on time management; much less find the time to do so! Yet, the transfer of these skills is precisely what the site is about, striving to make exceptional accessible content for all students, by students.

prototype for time management toolkit

Remedies

  • Vegetables hidden in the dessert: ‘toolkits’ were designed to be interactive, self-reflective, do-at-your-own-pace tools to learn skills, figure out an action plan and provide connection points to the variety of in-person resources, such as peer-academic coaching or the writing centre.
  • Accessible to all students: provide resources that are useful for all types of learners by including relevant videos, podcasts, software, print-outs and interactive activities.

PLEASE HELP US!!

Current Websitehttp://learningcommons.ubc.ca/

Prototype Website: http://learningcommons-redesign.sites.olt.ubc.ca/

The Learning Commons is meant to be an evolving project, grounded in feedback from our partners and students alike; we need your help! A few issues in particular we are struggling with:

General Navigation:

how do you find it moving between pages, not just navigation from the home page? Does it seem intuitive or confusing?

Headings and Categories:

We have three main categories that most of our content now resides in. Naming has been one of the biggest hangups, as the more popular headers tend to cause the most confusion about what content exists under them.

What we offer, for services and resources available to students, especially those available in the CLC. This has come across as the most solid heading.

Student toolkits for the interactive skill-building tools. Other options include:

  1. Become a Better Student
  2. Strategies for Students
  3. Learning Strategies
  4. Learning Secrets

Which option are you drawn to? The issue here as that this needs to come across as helpful without sounding remedial. Meanwhile, it has to be narrow enough of a definition to not confuse users as to where content should exist.

Beyond the Classroom as our main referral page to academically enriching opportunities, such as studying abroad, service learning, student directed seminars, etc. Other options include:

  1. Involvement
  2. Enhance your degree

Do these names and definitions makes sense? Particularly, are these headings so broad that you would have trouble placing what goes where and is there too much potential overlap?

Building pages around content, not fitting content into pages: this is where the raw information on the site exists. Using the wider pages offered by dropping the sidebar, we have tried to divide up the content that would make the most sense for the subject; instead of a standardized layout across all content pages.

  1. Take a look at a few different content pages (link, link link). does the idea of breaking up content make information easier to find or understand? Or would more standardization in layout be better?
  2. Consider how are current site lays out this content (link & link).
  3. The end result could be more of a hybrid, selecting one way of dividing up content (question 1), but using that layout arrangement for all the content pages.

Toolkits: go through our prototype time management toolkit. Tip, be sure to hit the print button after you’ve filled in the questions!

  1. Do you know where to start?
  2. Is the rest of the content on the page below the slideshow / reflective questions useful or necessary?
  3. Do you find the toolkit useful? Is this something that could help you manage your time better?

Glaring absences:

is anything missing from our previous site or from what you would expect to be here?

Any and all feedback is welcome in the comments section, on twitter, facebook or by email (peer.assistants@gmail.com)